Category Archives: QlikView

QV 12.10 “Can Execute External Programs” is back

In an earlier post I wrote about how to authorize the script Execute statement and the differences between QlikView versions 11 and 12.  I’ve just tested the new QlikView v12.10 Initial Release and the rules have changed again.

To run an Execute statement in QV12 Desktop requires that “User Preference, Security,  Script (Allow Database Write and Execute Statements)” be checked on.  This is also true in QV12.10.

An additional Script Setting “Can Execute External Programs” is present in QV12 but had no effect.  In QV12.10, this setting behaves as it does in QV11. If off, you will be asked to authorize when the Execute statement is encountered in the script.

For an Execute to run in QV12.10 Desktop without prompting, both “Script (Allow Database Write and Execute Statements)” and “Can Execute External Programs” must be on.

What about QV12.10 Server? Like QV12 Server, Execute is authorized by the setting:

AllowExecuteCommand=1

The value is set in “C:\Windows\System32\config\systemprofile\AppData\Roaming\QlikTech\QlikViewBatch\settings.ini”, and it is off by default after install.

Does QV12.10 Server need the  “Can Execute External Programs” setting? No. As a matter of fact, if it’s off, the reload sets it on. I don’t mean temporarily. I mean it sets and saves it in the qvw.

Updating the matrix from my previous post:execute-rules

 

What is the intent behind this QV12.10 change?  I’m not sure.

-Rob

Storing a Data Model in a Single QVD

Have you ever thought it might be interesting to store a  Qlik data model into a single QVD?  This can be useful in a number of cases such as:

  • Archiving (and retrieving) data models.
  • Overcoming the “single binary load” restriction.

QlikView Components (QVC) Version 11 introduced two new routines to do just that:

Qvc.ExportModel — Exports all tables of the current model into a single QVD.

Qvc.ImportModel — Import a data model created by Qvc.ExportModel.

Even if you don’t have QVC V11 installed, you can try Qvc.ExportModel right now using  http include.  Add these lines to any QlikView script (instructions for Qlik Sense further on down in this post).

$(Must_Include=https://github.com/RobWunderlich/Qlikview-Components/releases/download/v11.1/Qvc.qvs);
 CALL Qvc.ExportModel
 CALL Qvc.Cleanup

Mind the wrap. The Must_Include should be on one line. Using QVC requires the Qvc.qvs library be included (usually at the beginning of script), CALLing Qvc routines, and CALLing a Cleanup routine at the end of your script.

Assuming this script is included in “Sales Dash.qvw”,  the default exported model QVD will be named “Sales Dash.qvd” in the same directory.

 

Now, to import this QVD model into another qvw, replace the CALL to ExportModel in the above sample with:

CALL Qvc.ImportModel('Sales Dash.qvd')

The original model will be reconstructed as individual tables.

Qvc.ExportModel has three optional parameters:

CALL Qvc.ExportModel(['qvddir'],['qvdname'],['addTimestamp']);
Parameter Number Parameter Description
1 String. Optional. Relative or absolute directory where the model QVD will be stored. If relative, it follows the same rules as the STORE script statement for relative directory.
2 String, Optional. Name for the model QVD. If omitted, the name of the QVW will be used. For example, if QVW is “Sales.qvw”, then QVD will be “Sales.qvd”.
3 String, Optional. 1/0 True/False. If True, a timestamp of the form _YYYYMMDDhhmmss will be appended to the QVD name. Default if omitted is False.

 

Qlik Sense has no default path  so parameter #1, a lib:// for the QVD should be specified.  Alternatively, if a lib has been established with a DIRECTORY statement, parameter 1 can be omitted.

Qlik Sense will require a web file Connection for the http Must_Include.

webfile-connection

After defining the web connection and having an appropriate folder connection to store the QVD in,  Qlik Sense script would look like this:

$(Must_Include=lib://QvcWeb);
 Call Qvc.ExportModel('lib://QVData')
 CALL Qvc.Cleanup;

 

That’s all there is to it!  If you are already using QVC, I hope you’ll find these routines a welcome addition to the library.  If you are new to QC, explore more at QlikviewComponents.org.

-Rob

Thanks to Jörgen Peerik for raising the single-QVD export idea during a QVC class. 

 

Preparing your script for QV12

Summary: I provide a tool to check your script for compatibility with QlikView version 12. 

I’ve blogged about a couple of script changes in QV12 here.  Since then I’ve also noticed that the $(include) statement is also affected by the Directory statement. That is, if the script below works in QV11, it will not work in QV12:

DIRECTORY Data;
 $(Must_Include=config.txt);

This is because QV11 looks for the file in the working directory where the QVW is, whereas QV12 will respect the DIRECTORY statement and look in the Data directory.

To summarize compatabilty considerations for QV12:

How will you know if you have existing  script that may be impacted by these changes in QV12?  In an earlier post, I introduced the Script Repository tool which can be used to search script across QVWs.

You can use the tool to  search for potential issues.  But I thought I would make it a bit easier by adding a dedicated “Version 12 Upgrade Check” sheet that does the searching and highlighting for you.

The chart at the top of the sheet will list any document that has script that should be examined further.  Select a document, press the highlight button and the script of interest will be outlined in yellow.

My guess is that most customers will not have any compatibility issues.  But why take chances?  Be a hero and scan your script before upgrading.

-Rob

Join me at an upcoming Masters Summit for Qlik event in Johannesburg (6-8 Sept) or Austin (10-12 Oct).  In my Advanced Scripting session, in addition to teaching important scripting techniques, we’ll look at methods and tools for managing your “script farm”. 

Alt States Merged Selections Tip

Summary: I suggest a simpler syntax for merging selections from multiple states. 

You may be familiar with the “Product Grouping” example from the “What’s new in QlikView 11.qvw” sample.  It’s a great  beginner demo of using Alternate States for comparative analysis.

In this visualization, a user can select two sets of values from the [Product Sub Group] field. The two different sets are represented by two states, [Group 1] and [Group 2].  The blue [Group 1] bar is plotted on the bar chart using this expression:

sum({[Group 1]<Region = $::Region, [Sales Rep] = $::[Sales Rep], Path = $::Path, Year = $::Year, Quarter = $::Quarter, Month = $::Month>} Sales)

[Group 1]  as the Set Identifier indicates we want to start with the selections in [Group 1]. We then modify, or add, selections from the default state by referencing each field with the “$::fieldname” syntax.

The green [Group 2] bar is created with a similar expression, the only difference being [Group 2] as the Set Identifier.

The “$::fieldname” syntax works, but it forces us to list every field. Listing every field can get difficult. Is there an easier, more generic method?  Yes, if we redefine the problem as:  All selections from the Default state except for [Product Sub Group].

sum({[Group 1] * $<[Product Sub Group]=>} Sales)

Breaking the Set Expression down:

[Group 1]    // Group 1 selections
*    // Intersected with
$<[Product Sub Group]=>   // All selections from Default except [Product Sub Group]

I’m not suggesting  the sample is wrong. The “$::” syntax is useful to know and is required when you want to reference only specific fields.  I’m posting this alternative because I see people copying this more complex $::  syntax when the simpler syntax would suit their application.

-Rob

Join me at an upcoming Masters Summit for Qlik event in Johannesburg (6-8 Sept) or Austin (10-12 Oct).  Oleg Troyansky’s Set Analysis and Advanced Aggregation session provides  more useful tips and advanced techniques in using Alternate States.

 

 

Touchless Formatting

Summary: I show a scripting technique to assign display formats to loaded data without touching existing load statements. 

I coded in  SAS for many years and always appreciated the FORMAT statement which allows  assigning a display format to a field, independent of loading the field.

FORMAT OrderDate MM/DD/YYYY;

In QlikView and Qlik Sense script, there is an  equivalent that is useful to be aware of.   It’s not a statement, but a little known trick (so little known I’ve never seen anyone but me do it, although I’m sure others have thought if it).

// Load some dummy fields just to assign formats
TempFormatTable:
LOAD
 Date(0, 'MM/DD/YYYY') as OrderDate,
 Date(0, 'MM/DD/YYYY') as ShipDate,
 Num(0, '00000') as PostalCode,
 Num(0, '#,##0.00') as OrderTotal
AutoGenerate 0;

Facts: // Load the QVD
LOAD * FROM data1.qvd (qvd);

DROP TABLE TempFormatTable;  // Drop temp table

The formats assigned in the TempFormatTable will be inherited by any like-named fields in the QVD Load.   I sometimes find this easier than adding formatting function to the QVD Load statement because:

  • It maintains the optimized QVD load.
  • I can include a master list in the TempFormatTable. There is no error if a field doesn’t exist in the QVD.
  • Syntactically simpler.
  • I don’t touch the existing Load statement.

I don’t always format this way, but there are a number of scenarios where the technique is useful. A common application is to change formats from one locale to another. For example, loading a QVD created in Europe (with European formats) and assigning US Date and Number formats.

The technique works for any input source;  SQL, QVD, xls, etc. It works for both QlikView and Qlik Sense.

You may not ever need this tip, but if you do, I hope it saves you some time and makes your coding easier.

-Rob

Want more Tips & Tricks? Join me at an upcoming Masters Summit for Qlik event in Johannesburg (6-8 Sept) or Austin (10-12 Oct).  In addition to our two days of core sessions, Bill Lay’s “Tips & Tricks” on Day 3 always teaches me something new.  

QV12 Timestamp Parsing

Have you noticed something new in QlikView12 and Qlik Sense timestamp parsing? UTC timestamps are automatically understood.

(Note: the output displayed below utilizes the US Date format set in the script as:  SET TimestampFormat=’M/D/YYYY h:mm:ss[.fff] TT’;)

For example, the expression:

=Timestamp('20160504T142523.487-0500')

returns:

5/4/2016 7:25:23 PM

That is, the UTC offset of “-0500” is detected and the returned value is the UTC time, not the local time of 2:25:23 PM.

I can’t find anything in the help beyond an example  for Timestamp# that demonstrates this but provides no detail.

This parsing functionality is particularly useful now that the QlikView Server logfiles use the UTC format for times.

I’m not sure yet if I like the automatic conversion to UTC time.  For example, apps like the QlikView Governance Dashboard now report Session Start or Event times in UTC time, not local time.

It’s nice that the “T” character is understood. If you want local time, it’s easy enough to drop the offset (“-0500”) as

=Timestamp(left('20160504T142523.487-0500', 19))

which returns

5/4/2016 2:25:23 PM

-Rob

 

Scaling Numbers and DSE Tips

Summary: I demonstrate a simple reusable expression to auto scale numbers in QlikView. This leads to an exploration of some of the finer details of dollar sign expansion.

A QVW example to accompany this post is available for download at http://qlikviewcookbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/ScalingNumbers.qvw.

The QlikView auto-scaling feature selects an appropriate unit – billion, million, thousands — based on the magnitude of the  Y-axis values.  It’s a nice feature  available in Line and Bar charts.  How can we create the same functionality in Text Objects or Straight Tables?

It’s easy enough to use an if() function that tests the magnitude, does any necessary division, and formats appropriately. For example:

if(Sum(Sales)>1E6, num(Sum(Sales)/1E6,'$#,##0.000M')
 ,if(Sum(Sales)>1E3, num(Sum(Sales)/1E3,'$#,##0.000K')
 ,num(Sum(Sales),'$#,##0')
 ))

(The 1E6 is an easier way to write 1000000).

To avoid repeated coding of “Sum(Sales)” I create a reusable variable with parameters in the script like this:

SET vScaleNumber=if($1>1E6, num($1/1E6,'$#,##0.000M')
 ,if($1>1E3, num($1/1E3,'$#,##0.000K')
 ,num($1,'$#,##0')
 ));

Now I can use the variable vScaleNumber in a Text Object as:

=$(vScaleNumber(Sum(Sales)))

The string “Sum(Sales)” will get substituted in  every occurrence of “$1”.  I ‘ll get an appropriately formatted number like:

If I use “$(vScaleNumber(Sum(Sales)))” in a Straight Table expression without label, hovering over the column heading will show me the full substitution in  a tooltip.

I  can see that the “$1” substitution occurs before the expression is evaluated, and the substituted expression looks like:

if(Sum(Sales)>1E6, num(Sum(Sales)/1E6,'$#,##0.000M')
 ,if(Sum(Sales)>1E3, num(Sum(Sales)/1E3,'$#,##0.000K')
 ,num(Sum(Sales),'$#,##0')
 ))

I’ve avoided re-typing “Sum(Sales)”. But I may have a concern about the performance implications of repeated execution of “Sum(Sales)”.  And what about more complex expressions such as “Round(Sum(Sales),10)”?  The comma in that expression will break the syntax as variable parameters always treat commas as parameter separators.

I can fix the comma/performance problem by using Dollar Sign Expansion (DSE) with an “=”.  The “=” will cause the expression to evaluate and pass the numerical result to vScaleNumber.

=$(vScaleNumber($(=round(Sum(Sales),10))))

Checking the expansion in a Straight Table shows:

if(1783150>1E6, num(1783150/1E6,'$#,##0.000M')
,if(1783150>1E3, num(1783150/1E3,'$#,##0.000K')
,num(1783150,'$#,##0')
))

I  see the value of “round(Sum(Sales),10)” has been calculated as “1783150”,  yielding an efficient and syntactically correct expression.

Next  I’ll add a Dimension to the Straight Table.  The row results are incorrect!

The “=” in the DSE caused the Sum expression  to be evaluated only once for the entire chart, yielding the same value for every row.  How to fix?

I will calculate the sum() expression in a n Expression n column, and then hide this column on the Presentation tab. I can then refer to the hidden column:

=$(vScaleNumber(Column(1)))

Once again, the expansion yields an efficient and syntactically correct expression.

if(Column(1)>1E6, num(Column(1)/1E6,'$#,##0.000M')
 ,if(Column(1)>1E3, num(Column(1)/1E3,'$#,##0.000K')
 ,num(Column(1),'$#,##0')
 ))

I started this post by demonstrating a simple expression to format scaled numbers. It’s a function I frequently use.

For more on DSE, see Henric’s post at https://community.qlik.com/blogs/qlikviewdesignblog/2013/11/18/dollar-expansions

A QVW example to accompany this post is available for download at http://qlikviewcookbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/ScalingNumbers.qvw.

-Rob

Scoping Selections with Aggr()

Summary: Selections can be made in Calculated Dimensions, although the result may not always be what is expected or desired.   The Aggr() function can be used to control what field(s) get selected.

The technique discussed in this post applies to both QlikView and Qlik Sense.  The screenshots shown are from QlikView.  Some of the visuals are a bit different in Qlik Sense, but the idea and expressions demonstrated are the same.

A downloadable example to accompany this post is available here.

Consider a listbox created with an <Expression> value of:

=Customer & ' -- ' & Country

A listbox constructed this way is useful for providing additional context or an  additional search.

Selections made in that listbox will make underlying selections in both Customer and Country.

The user is probably  expecting a selection in Customer only.  To limit the selection to Customer, add an Aggr() function to the expression:

=aggr(
 Customer & ' -- ' & Country
 ,Customer)

Only the Customer field is listed in the Aggr() dimension, so selections will be made only in Customer.

A side effect of adding Aggr() is that gray (unassociated) rows no longer display.  We can fix that with a bit of Set Analysis.

=aggr(
 only({1<Customer={"*"}>} Customer & ' -- ' & Country)
 ,Customer)

Now the listbox looks and behaves as expected.

 

Another place you may need Aggr() to control selection intent is chart Calculated Dimensions.

Hovering over a Salesrep value in the chart below gives a contextual popup that identifies Manager and Hire Date associated with the Rep.

The column was created as a Calculated Dimension:

=SalesPerson
& chr(10) & 'Reports to ' & [Sales Manager]
& chr(10) & 'Hire Date ' & date(HireDate,'YYYY-MMM-DD')

Clicking Michelle in the chart correctly selects her name as SalesPerson, but makes unexpected selections in HireDate and SalesManager.

I’m going to say that the dimension is “improperly scoped” and correct it by adding Aggr() to the Calculated Dimension.

=Aggr(
 SalesPerson
 & chr(10) & 'Reports to ' & [Sales Manager]
 & chr(10) & 'Hire Date ' & date(HireDate,'YYYY-MMM-DD')
 ,SalesPerson)

Selections will now be correctly limited to the “SalesPerson” field.

 

We’ve seen that Aggr() can narrow selections. We can widen selections as well.  This listbox will make selections in Customer, Country, SalesPerson and Year, even though only Customer is displayed in the listbox.

=aggr(
 only({1}
 Customer
 )
 ,Customer, Country, SalesPerson, Year)

 

We don’t have to include the display field in the selections.  In what I’ll call a  “backdoor associative search” , this expression will display Customer, but selects only the OrderID values associated with the Customer.

=aggr(
only({1}Customer )
,OrderID)

It’s usually a best practice to pre-create Calculated Dimensions in the script, when possible, for performance reasons. Returning to our first example, we might create a new field in the script as:

Customer & ' -- ' & Country AS CustomerAndCountry

We can use the new field as a display value, but we want selections to be made in Customer.

=aggr(
 only({1}  CustomerAndCountry)
 ,Customer)

 

As a last example,  we can create  “bookmark” like alternatives; either new fields linked in the data model or advanced search at run time.

Here I’ve linked a hidden field named “Bookmark” into specific OrderIDs in the script.  I want selections to be reflected in the OrderID field.

=aggr(only({1}Bookmark), Bookmark,OrderID)

Here is an advanced search that presents a listbox of Customers who have placed at least one order with a value >50K.

=aggr(
only({1<OrderID={"=sum({1}OrderAmount)>50000"}>}Customer )
,Customer)

Aggr() can be a “heavy resource consumer” and has the potential to slow down your application. Use only when required and avoid using or benchmark the impact in large applications.  Calculated Dimensions can also be a source of slow performance, precalculate fields in the script when possible.

Download the  example qvw for this post .

-Rob