Category Archives: QlikView

QV12 Variables with Alt State Fixed

Summary:  QV11 contained an inconsistency in how variables with equal signs were evaluated when using Alternate States.  This has been fixed in QV12.10.  Read on if you want the details. 

QlikView V12.10 includes an important fix to variable evaluation when using alternate states. A quote from the Release Notes:

In QV11.20 the variable was expanded in the first state encountered and this resulted in a random behavior when more than one alternate state was being used. Whereas in version 12 and up, the variable always belongs to a specific alternate state and this results in different behavior.

The random behavior described in QV11.20 has generated several interesting posts to QlikCommunity with responses of “I can reproduce” / “I can’t reproduce” and few clear answers.

I find the problem confusing and interesting enough to warrant an explanation and example beyond the Release Note.

What I am describing in this post only affects variables with a leading “=” in the definition, e.g. “=Sum(Sales)”.  These variables are calculated once in the context of the entire document. They are not calculated per row in a chart.

Let’s consider a variable named “vSumX” with a definition of “=Sum(X)”.  The expression simply sums all selected values of X.   Suppose we have two States in our document — “Default” and “State1”.  There could be two different selections for “X”.  Which set of X should the variable sum?

If we consider the variable definition in isolation, the answer is “Default set”  as there is no set identifier in the expression.  But what if the variable is referenced in an object in State1.  Should the State1 values of X be used?

No matter what you think the rules should be, here’s what was happening in QV11.20.  The variable was expanded (evaluated) in the first state encountered.  First state encountered means first state in the calculation chain, not something the developer directly controls.

Let’s look at some examples.   I’ve created a sample app (you can download here) with three States — Default,  State1 and State2.  The variable “vSumX” is defined as “=Sum(X)”.

With all objects on sheet in the Default state, selections in X would yield results like this.  (Note “$” indicates default state).

The first text box contains the expression “Sum(X)”.  The second text object contains the reference to variable vSumX.  The two values are what we might expect, summing the selected values of X in this state.

Let’s switch to a sheet that contains objects in the state named “State1”.

No selections in X and the first text object shows the expected result.  The second object shows the value of vSumX as previously calculated from the default state.  If we make selections on this State1 sheet, that will cause vSumX to be recalculated and both State1 and the Default sheet will reflect the State 1 number.  Is that correct?  Is it useful?  It’s at least consistent and comprehensible.

My next example is where the aforementioned “random” comes into play.  Let’s put objects from three states on the same sheet.

I’ve selected some values in the Default state of X and the results are what I might expect.  The value of vSumX is calculated from my last selections and the variable value is consistent across objects — there is only ever one value for a variable at a given point in time.

Now I select some X values in State1 and expect to see a new value (19) for vSumX.  But no change! The variable was expanded (evaluated) in the first state encountered which happened to be Default ($).

Now I select some X values in State2.  If the vSumX calc used my last selection I would expect to see 7.  But no, I see 19.  The State1 values were used.  If I repeat the exercise, it may use a different state to calc vSumX.  If you test you may get different results.  In this last example, State1 was used because it was the first state encountered in the calculation chain.  The order is not consistent.  It will be influenced by factors such as number of available processors and the order in which the objects were created.

Now that we’ve established that QV11,20 is broken in this regard, how was it fixed in QV12.10?  Simple.  QV12 uses  set identifiers as specified in the expression, without inheritance.

=Sum(X)

will use the Default State as there is no identifier.   If you want to Sum from a specific state, use it in the expression:

=Sum({State1} X)

Variables do not belong to any State.  Aggregation functions used in a variable may specify a Statename, just as chart expression do.  The difference is that the absence of a set identifier in a chart expression means “inherit the state from the containing object”.  In a “=” variable, no set identifier means “use the default state”.

A reminder that end of standard support for QV11 comes on Dec 8, 2017.  If you haven’t yet upgraded to QV12.10, I encourage you to do so.  Download my  QV12 Upgrade Considerations Doc as part of your planning process.  Feel free to contact me if you want some assistance with your upgrade.

-Rob

Update:  Qlik has extended support for QV11.20 to March 31, 2018. 

Share

Document Analyzer Batch Analysis

I’ve received several requests to provide a batch interface to the popular QV Document Analyzer tool that will provide for analyzing multiple QVWs with a single command.  It’s now available for download here.

The script is a windows cmd file.  Because many browsers block download of cmd files, I’ve provided it with a “txt” extension. Rename to “DABatch.cmd” after downloading.

The usage from the command line is:

DaBatch.cmd somedir
 where “somedir” is a directory of QVWs to be analyzed.   Each QVW in the directory will be processed by Document Analyzer and the results will be saved for later review.
Before running, there are a number of configuration variables in DABatch.cmd you will want to review and modify as necessary.

 

REM *** Path to QV.exe executable ***

SET qvDir=C:\Program Files\QlikView\Qv.exe

This is location of the QV Desktop executable. The provided value is the default location for most users and is typically appropriate as-is.

REM *** Path to DocumentAnalyzer.qvw. Note that v3.6 or later is required! ***

SET DaPath=DocumentAnalyzer_V3.6.qvw
Where is the Document Analyzer.qvw to be found?  Note that DA V3.6 or later is required by DABatch.

 

REM *** Directory to store DocumentAnalyzerResults QVDs and QVWs. Will be created if it doesn't exist *** SET DaResultsDir=C:\temp\MyDaResults
Specify the directory where analysis results will be saved.  If this directory does not exist, it will be created.

 

REM *** Should the analyzer results be stored in a QVD (YES/NO)? ***
SET SaveResultsInQVD=YES
Do you want to save the DA results in a QVD for later analysis by the DaCompareTool.qvw?  The default of “YES” is usually appropriate here.   QVD result files include a timestamp so you will always get new files for each run. Change to “NO” if you don’t want result QVDs.

 

REM *** Should the analyzer results be stored in a QVW (YES/NO)? ***

SET SaveResultsInQVW=YES
If “YES”, a DA QVW will be saved for each analysis and named “DocumentAnalyzer_your_qvwname.qvw”.  If a file exists with this name, it will be overwritten. If you don’t want individual DA QVWs, change this variable to “NO”.

 

After launching DABatch, you will receive one prompt:
Analysis Title? <ENTER> for 'Baseline'
The prompt is requesting a title to be assigned to the Result QVDs that will be consumed by DaCompareTool.  To accept the default of “Baseline”,  press <Enter>.  Otherwise type a new value and press <Enter>.


If you have set “SET SaveResultsInQVD=NO” as a configuration option, the title value is irrelevant.  (Perhaps I should not prompt in that case; next version?).


While the script is running Document Analyzer windows will be launched for each QVW and progress message displayed.  It’s best to keep your hands off the keyboard to get proper timings.  Good time to get that coffee.

When execution is complete you’ll see a summary message.
*****************************************************
Batch Analysis complete. 3 QVWs analyzed.
*****************************************************


You can now review each”DocumentAnalyzer_your_qvwname.qvw” file or load the result QVDs into DaCompareTool.qvw for comparative analysis.


Please let me know in the comments section if you can think of enhancements that support your use case for DA batch analysis.


-Rob
Share

QV12 REM Logging Change

Summary: QV12 no longer prints the REM statement to the Document Log.

In QV11 “//” and “/*” comments do not appear in the Document Log, but “REM” comments do appear in the log.  I found REM useful to provide some documentation in my logfile or record which branch was taken in an IF-THEN-ELSE.

QV12 has changed the logging of REM.  The REM statement will now appear in the log obfuscated as a series of asterisks  For example, the statement

REM  Beginning of weekly load;

will appear in the log as

2017-05-18 14:24:34 0005 *** *** ******

My understanding is that the change was made to support security standards, as someone could REM a CONNECT string or other sensitive data thereby exposing it in the log.

To provide log documentation, use the TRACE statement instead.  I don’t find TRACE as pretty as REM because TRACE generates double lines, but it will do the job.

I maintain a collection of upgrade notes for QV12 that you can download here to assist in your planning.  Please do read all the Qlik doc — release notes and help site — as well.

-Rob

 

Share

QlikView to Qlik Sense Convertor

Are you migrating QlikView Apps to Qlik Sense?  Have you tried the new QlikView Convertor tool in QS 3.2? 

The QV Convertor tool is available from the Dev Hub in QS 3.2+.  It’s a pretty slick tool that converts QV Variables, Dimensions and Expressions to Master items and converts QV charts to Master QS Visualizations.  It does not attempt to replicate the sheets,  but expects you to place the visualizations on sheets yourself as required.

It’s a very useful tool with a good UI that allows for filtering and limiting what gets converted.

At the Atlanta Qlik Dev Group meeting on July 13 I’ll be demonstrating the tool and presenting some tips and considerations for doing conversions.   They’ve given me two hours (!) to speak so I’ll be covering several other topics as well.

-Rob

Share

Cookbook Tools Updates

Just a quick note about some recent updates to the Tools available on QlikViewCookbook.com

  • QV Document Analyzer V3.5 
    • Added new computed field, “Expression Table Count” that identifies how many tables are involved in a given expression.  Expressions that use data from more than one table typically run slower then those with all data in a single table.
    • Added “Like Objects Count” attribute for Objects, identifying candidates for linked objects.
    • Bug fixes.
  • Copy Groups Utility V2 allows for copying groups within the same QVW.
  • Script Log Analyzer V1.6 can analyze reload logs from both QlikView and Qlik Sense, Desktop and Server versions.  Interface is available in four languages.

-Rob

Share

QV 12.10 “Can Execute External Programs” is back

In an earlier post I wrote about how to authorize the script Execute statement and the differences between QlikView versions 11 and 12.  I’ve just tested the new QlikView v12.10 Initial Release and the rules have changed again.

To run an Execute statement in QV12 Desktop requires that “User Preference, Security,  Script (Allow Database Write and Execute Statements)” be checked on.  This is also true in QV12.10.

An additional Script Setting “Can Execute External Programs” is present in QV12 but had no effect.  In QV12.10, this setting behaves as it does in QV11. If off, you will be asked to authorize when the Execute statement is encountered in the script.

For an Execute to run in QV12.10 Desktop without prompting, both “Script (Allow Database Write and Execute Statements)” and “Can Execute External Programs” must be on.

What about QV12.10 Server? Like QV12 Server, Execute is authorized by the setting:

AllowExecuteCommand=1

The value is set in “C:\Windows\System32\config\systemprofile\AppData\Roaming\QlikTech\QlikViewBatch\settings.ini”, and it is off by default after install.

Does QV12.10 Server need the  “Can Execute External Programs” setting? No. As a matter of fact, if it’s off, the reload sets it on. I don’t mean temporarily. I mean it sets and saves it in the qvw.

Updating the matrix from my previous post:execute-rules

 

What is the intent behind this QV12.10 change?  I’m not sure.

-Rob

Share

Storing a Data Model in a Single QVD

Have you ever thought it might be interesting to store a  Qlik data model into a single QVD?  This can be useful in a number of cases such as:

  • Archiving (and retrieving) data models.
  • Overcoming the “single binary load” restriction.

QlikView Components (QVC) Version 11 introduced two new routines to do just that:

Qvc.ExportModel — Exports all tables of the current model into a single QVD.

Qvc.ImportModel — Import a data model created by Qvc.ExportModel.

Even if you don’t have QVC V11 installed, you can try Qvc.ExportModel right now using  http include.  Add these lines to any QlikView script (instructions for Qlik Sense further on down in this post).

$(Must_Include=https://github.com/RobWunderlich/Qlikview-Components/releases/download/v11.1/Qvc.qvs);
 CALL Qvc.ExportModel
 CALL Qvc.Cleanup

Mind the wrap. The Must_Include should be on one line. Using QVC requires the Qvc.qvs library be included (usually at the beginning of script), CALLing Qvc routines, and CALLing a Cleanup routine at the end of your script.

Assuming this script is included in “Sales Dash.qvw”,  the default exported model QVD will be named “Sales Dash.qvd” in the same directory.

 

Now, to import this QVD model into another qvw, replace the CALL to ExportModel in the above sample with:

CALL Qvc.ImportModel('Sales Dash.qvd')

The original model will be reconstructed as individual tables.

Qvc.ExportModel has three optional parameters:

CALL Qvc.ExportModel(['qvddir'],['qvdname'],['addTimestamp']);
Parameter Number Parameter Description
1 String. Optional. Relative or absolute directory where the model QVD will be stored. If relative, it follows the same rules as the STORE script statement for relative directory.
2 String, Optional. Name for the model QVD. If omitted, the name of the QVW will be used. For example, if QVW is “Sales.qvw”, then QVD will be “Sales.qvd”.
3 String, Optional. 1/0 True/False. If True, a timestamp of the form _YYYYMMDDhhmmss will be appended to the QVD name. Default if omitted is False.

 

Qlik Sense has no default path  so parameter #1, a lib:// for the QVD should be specified.  Alternatively, if a lib has been established with a DIRECTORY statement, parameter 1 can be omitted.

Qlik Sense will require a web file Connection for the http Must_Include.

webfile-connection

After defining the web connection and having an appropriate folder connection to store the QVD in,  Qlik Sense script would look like this:

$(Must_Include=lib://QvcWeb);
 Call Qvc.ExportModel('lib://QVData')
 CALL Qvc.Cleanup;

 

That’s all there is to it!  If you are already using QVC, I hope you’ll find these routines a welcome addition to the library.  If you are new to QC, explore more at QlikviewComponents.org.

-Rob

Thanks to Jörgen Peerik for raising the single-QVD export idea during a QVC class. 

 

Share

Preparing your script for QV12

Summary: I provide a tool to check your script for compatibility with QlikView version 12. 

I’ve blogged about a couple of script changes in QV12 here.  Since then I’ve also noticed that the $(include) statement is also affected by the Directory statement. That is, if the script below works in QV11, it will not work in QV12:

DIRECTORY Data;
 $(Must_Include=config.txt);

This is because QV11 looks for the file in the working directory where the QVW is, whereas QV12 will respect the DIRECTORY statement and look in the Data directory.

To summarize compatabilty considerations for QV12:

How will you know if you have existing  script that may be impacted by these changes in QV12?  In an earlier post, I introduced the Script Repository tool which can be used to search script across QVWs.

You can use the tool to  search for potential issues.  But I thought I would make it a bit easier by adding a dedicated “Version 12 Upgrade Check” sheet that does the searching and highlighting for you.

The chart at the top of the sheet will list any document that has script that should be examined further.  Select a document, press the highlight button and the script of interest will be outlined in yellow.

My guess is that most customers will not have any compatibility issues.  But why take chances?  Be a hero and scan your script before upgrading.

-Rob

Join me at an upcoming Masters Summit for Qlik event in Johannesburg (6-8 Sept) or Austin (10-12 Oct).  In my Advanced Scripting session, in addition to teaching important scripting techniques, we’ll look at methods and tools for managing your “script farm”. 

Share

Alt States Merged Selections Tip

Summary: I suggest a simpler syntax for merging selections from multiple states. 

You may be familiar with the “Product Grouping” example from the “What’s new in QlikView 11.qvw” sample.  It’s a great  beginner demo of using Alternate States for comparative analysis.

In this visualization, a user can select two sets of values from the [Product Sub Group] field. The two different sets are represented by two states, [Group 1] and [Group 2].  The blue [Group 1] bar is plotted on the bar chart using this expression:

sum({[Group 1]<Region = $::Region, [Sales Rep] = $::[Sales Rep], Path = $::Path, Year = $::Year, Quarter = $::Quarter, Month = $::Month>} Sales)

[Group 1]  as the Set Identifier indicates we want to start with the selections in [Group 1]. We then modify, or add, selections from the default state by referencing each field with the “$::fieldname” syntax.

The green [Group 2] bar is created with a similar expression, the only difference being [Group 2] as the Set Identifier.

The “$::fieldname” syntax works, but it forces us to list every field. Listing every field can get difficult. Is there an easier, more generic method?  Yes, if we redefine the problem as:  All selections from the Default state except for [Product Sub Group].

sum({[Group 1] * $<[Product Sub Group]=>} Sales)

Breaking the Set Expression down:

[Group 1]    // Group 1 selections
*    // Intersected with
$<[Product Sub Group]=>   // All selections from Default except [Product Sub Group]

I’m not suggesting  the sample is wrong. The “$::” syntax is useful to know and is required when you want to reference only specific fields.  I’m posting this alternative because I see people copying this more complex $::  syntax when the simpler syntax would suit their application.

-Rob

Join me at an upcoming Masters Summit for Qlik event in Johannesburg (6-8 Sept) or Austin (10-12 Oct).  Oleg Troyansky’s Set Analysis and Advanced Aggregation session provides  more useful tips and advanced techniques in using Alternate States.

 

 

Share

Touchless Formatting

Summary: I show a scripting technique to assign display formats to loaded data without touching existing load statements. 

I coded in  SAS for many years and always appreciated the FORMAT statement which allows  assigning a display format to a field, independent of loading the field.

FORMAT OrderDate MM/DD/YYYY;

In QlikView and Qlik Sense script, there is an  equivalent that is useful to be aware of.   It’s not a statement, but a little known trick (so little known I’ve never seen anyone but me do it, although I’m sure others have thought if it).

// Load some dummy fields just to assign formats
TempFormatTable:
LOAD
 Date(0, 'MM/DD/YYYY') as OrderDate,
 Date(0, 'MM/DD/YYYY') as ShipDate,
 Num(0, '00000') as PostalCode,
 Num(0, '#,##0.00') as OrderTotal
AutoGenerate 0;

Facts: // Load the QVD
LOAD * FROM data1.qvd (qvd);

DROP TABLE TempFormatTable;  // Drop temp table

The formats assigned in the TempFormatTable will be inherited by any like-named fields in the QVD Load.   I sometimes find this easier than adding formatting function to the QVD Load statement because:

  • It maintains the optimized QVD load.
  • I can include a master list in the TempFormatTable. There is no error if a field doesn’t exist in the QVD.
  • Syntactically simpler.
  • I don’t touch the existing Load statement.

I don’t always format this way, but there are a number of scenarios where the technique is useful. A common application is to change formats from one locale to another. For example, loading a QVD created in Europe (with European formats) and assigning US Date and Number formats.

The technique works for any input source;  SQL, QVD, xls, etc. It works for both QlikView and Qlik Sense.

You may not ever need this tip, but if you do, I hope it saves you some time and makes your coding easier.

-Rob

Want more Tips & Tricks? Join me at an upcoming Masters Summit for Qlik event in Johannesburg (6-8 Sept) or Austin (10-12 Oct).  In addition to our two days of core sessions, Bill Lay’s “Tips & Tricks” on Day 3 always teaches me something new.  

Share