Category Archives: Tools

Exploring Data Lineage with NodeGraph

In the Qlik world, we are frequently faced with questions like:

  • Where did this field come from?
  • What applications (if any) use this QVD?
  • If I change this database table, what applications will be affected?
  • Am I creating QVDs that are not being consumed?

I’ve maintained a QlikView lineage application for my customers over the years.  I was never completely happy with it as Qlik lineage metadata is inconsistent and the critically important field level lineage was never available.

All that changed when I discovered NodeGraph.  Now I’m a NodeGraph fan and partner.

NodeGraph is an add-on for your QlikView and Qlik Sense solutions that allows you to explore, visualize and trace where your data comes from, whether it’s up-to-date, how it’s calculated, and much more.

NodeGraph scans both QlikView and Qlik Sense files and produces a graph of applications and data in a beautiful easy to navigate interface.  Select any node, for example a dashboard QVW, and lines trace the data lineage through transformed QVDs all the way back to the source database.

 

You can search, filter and drill in any direction;  from applications,  QVDs, source tables, fields, charts or SQL queries.

Where did this field come from?  Right-Click any field and select the Field Explorer to get a report of the complete lineage for this field, including all script transformations!

 

I’m looking at a chart that shows a count of Customers.  How was that count calculated? Where did the data come from?  In the Content view I can review the expression and see the lineage for fields used.

 

One of my favorite features is the one-click application documentation.  The tool generates a pretty printable/PDF document suitable for Auditors that describes all data sources, transformations, and expressions used in the selected application.

 

There are more uses and features in NodeGraph than I can cover in a blog post, including governance reports, application usage, GDPR compliance and testing.

If you are coming to Qonnections,  see NodeGraph in action at the TechLab10 booth (#603) in the Discovery Expo.

Learn more about NodeGraph at nodegraph.se. If you have questions or would like to schedule a free demo,  reach out to the NodeGraph team on the website or info@nodegraph.se.  If you are in North America you can contact me directly for questions or to scheduling a demo.

-Rob

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QViewer Acquisition

I’m pleased to announce that I’ve acquired the excellent QViewer tool from Dmitry Gudkov effective January 1.  I’ll be marketing, developing and supporting QViewer going forward.

QViewer has a stellar reputation as a must have tool for Qlik Developers.  I’m pleased to be taking over such a fine product.

This acquisition is one step in my plan to focus more on software development during 2018.  Stay tuned for other announcements during the year.

Existing licensed QViewer customers should email future support requests to support@panalyticsinc.com.

Happy New Year!

-Rob

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DevTool Extension for Qlik Sense

One of the benefits of attending the Masters Summit for Qlik is networking and the things you can learn from discussions with peers.

At the Boston Summit, I was fortunate to meet Erik Wetterberg, formerly of Qlik R&D and known to me as the author of the qsVariable and DevTool extensions.  I’ve been a fan of the DevTool extension for some time and had a nice chat with Erik about potential enhancements to DevTool.   Since the summit Erik has made some updates and accepted new function I’ve added to the tool.

DevTool provides some functions that are useful during Qlik Sense app development and debugging.  Download the DevTool zip from the dist folder here https://github.com/erikwett/DevTool and install as you would any other extension.

Add  the extension to any sheet and it will create an Action Button (AB) to the lower right corner of the sheet.

You don’t have to leave the extension in the app, the AB will remain until you close the app.  I usually don’t leave it in the app, I just add it and then remove by double clicking DevTool in the assets panel and follow that with a Ctrl-z undo.

You can leave it in the app if you wish.  There are some considerations discussed below for leaving it in a published app.

Clicking the AB will toggle a tooltip above each sheet object that initially displays the objectid.  The objectid is useful when building mashups or reviewing diagnostic data.   As selections are made and the objects are recalculated, the tooltip will add a line showing the time in milliseconds for the current calculation as well as the max calculation time for this object.

 

Click the “properties” button on the tooltip and this object’s json formatted properties will display in a popup.  Use the copy-to-clipboard button to copy all or selected property lines to the clipboard.

Right-Click the AB to open a context menu that provides for:

  • Exporting script to a text file.
  • Importing (replacing) script from a text file.
  • Exporting variables in script or json format.

The extension works equally well in desktop or server.  Some things to think about before including it in a published app.

  • Users normally can’t see the load script and variables in a published app, but they can with this extension.
  • Although the script import works without error in a published app, the change to script is not saved so effectively nothing has been updated.

For myself, I’ve been thinking of this as a tool to use during development only and have not been including it in published apps.  I’d be curious to hear if someone has made a different decision.

The extension buttons use a google font. I note that many servers are blocked from the internet. If this is your case, you will see red dots for the buttons instead of proper symbols.  The buttons are still fully functional.

Maybe I’ll see you at the Masters Summit in Prague  where you might find your own interesting collaboration.

-Rob

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Mass Editing of QVW Script

Summary: In this post I describe a process using freely available tools to apply changes to all scripts in a set of QVW files.

So you have a lot of QVWs. And now you are asked to identify and make updates to all scripts to support changes such as:

  • A change in QVD or other file naming.
  • Changes in file paths due to a server move or directory restructuring.
  • Updating file paths to use variables.

If you are super cool, all those items are represented by variables, changes are handled by updating a single include file and you can relax and stop  reading this post. For the rest of us, read on.

You can scan and search all your script using my Script Repository tool.  That will allow to identify where changes are required, but do you have time to edit every QVW and make the changes?  Easy enough for a few, but what about when you have dozens?

QlikView Desktop has a useful facility we can leverage for mass changes; the “-prj” folder.  If a folder named qvwname-prj  (case sensitive) exists in the same folder as the QVW, when the QVW is saved, QV Desktop will write a set of text files representing the structure of the QVW to the -prj folder.  One of those files is “LoadScript.txt” which contains the load script.

When QV Desktop opens a file, it checks for the existence of a companion -prj.  If found, it populates the QVW with the contents of the files in the -prj.  If we change one of those files, for example “LoadScript.txt”,  that change will be inherited by the QVW.

Let’s walk thorough a scenario where we can utilize this feature to update the scripts of an entire set of QVWs.  I’ll utilize free tools that will make the process easier.

My sample problem is this: I have inconsistent QVD naming conventions. We’ve decided that “DimCustomer.qvd” shall henceforth be known simply as “Customer.qvd”. I’ll need to update the script that generates the QVD as well as all readers of the QVD.

I will accomplish this update in four steps:

  1. Create -prj folders for all QVWs.
  2. In the “LoadScript.txt” files replace “DimCustomer.qvd” with “Customer.qvd”.
  3. Rebuild the QVWs with the updated -prj.
  4. (Optional) Delete the -prj files.

The sample I’ll use for this post is relatively small to keep the demo simple.  But I’ve used this technique to process hundreds of QVWs at a time incorporating several different script edits.

I have a directory of QVWs that looks like this:

 

 

In the SubFolder “Loaders”, there are additional QVWs.

 

 

I’ll need a -prj folder for each QVW. I  can create the -prj manually, but this is where I can leverage the PrjTool to make life easier.  You can download the PrjTool from the Tools section of this site.  (Note: If you received a copy of PrjTool from the Masters Summit, please download this newer version as it contains important updates.)

PrjTool requires a Directory as input and the selection of one of  three functions:

  • BuildPrj: For all QVW files found in the specified Directory, create a -prj folder.  This includes opening and saving the QVW to populate the -prj.
  • CreateFromPrj: For all -prj folders found in the specified Directory, open and save the QVW to update the QVW with contents of the -prj.  If no QVW exists, a new one will be created.
  • DeletePrj: Delete all -prj folders found in the  specified Directory.

I’ll start by specifying the Directory that holds our QVWs and selecting the BuildPrj function.  Press the Execute button and the script will launch. The execution may take some time as each QVW has to be opened and saved. Good time to go for a coffee.

When the execution completes the log window will be filled with messages listing the -prj folders created by the tool.

 

If we examine the directory again we will see the new -prj folders.

 

Our next task is to edit the LoadScript.txt files. We can use any editor capable of searching and replacing across multiple files.  For this demo I will use the free NotePad++ editor.   From the NotePad++ menu, launch “Search” , “Find in File”.  In the search dialog I specify the Directory  and  the search and replace strings. I’ll also limit the search to the LoadScript.txt files.

 

After pressing “Find All”,  I’ll get a list of search results.  I can double click any of the results to open the file for further examination.

 

When I’m satisfied that I’m going to make the correct updates, I again launch “Find in Files” and press “Replace in Files”  to perform the update.

Now I’ll use the PrjTool again to update the QVWs with the updated -prj files.  I run the tool again, this time selecting the “CreateFromPrj” function.  Again, if you have a lot of large QVWs, be patient while the tool runs.  The resulting log messages will inform me of the updates.

We’re done!  All QVWs now contain the updated load script.  Optionally we can run the tool again with the “DeletePrj” function to delete the generated -prj folders.

You should always perform this kind of mass update activity on copies of QVWs and audit the results.  Also, never use -prj folders in production.  Server reloads do not recognize -prj folders.

-Rob

 

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Document Analyzer Batch Analysis

I’ve received several requests to provide a batch interface to the popular QV Document Analyzer tool that will provide for analyzing multiple QVWs with a single command.  It’s now available for download here.

The script is a windows cmd file.  Because many browsers block download of cmd files, I’ve provided it with a “txt” extension. Rename to “DABatch.cmd” after downloading.

The usage from the command line is:

DaBatch.cmd somedir
 where “somedir” is a directory of QVWs to be analyzed.   Each QVW in the directory will be processed by Document Analyzer and the results will be saved for later review.
Before running, there are a number of configuration variables in DABatch.cmd you will want to review and modify as necessary.

 

REM *** Path to QV.exe executable ***

SET qvDir=C:\Program Files\QlikView\Qv.exe

This is location of the QV Desktop executable. The provided value is the default location for most users and is typically appropriate as-is.

REM *** Path to DocumentAnalyzer.qvw. Note that v3.6 or later is required! ***

SET DaPath=DocumentAnalyzer_V3.6.qvw
Where is the Document Analyzer.qvw to be found?  Note that DA V3.6 or later is required by DABatch.

 

REM *** Directory to store DocumentAnalyzerResults QVDs and QVWs. Will be created if it doesn't exist *** SET DaResultsDir=C:\temp\MyDaResults
Specify the directory where analysis results will be saved.  If this directory does not exist, it will be created.

 

REM *** Should the analyzer results be stored in a QVD (YES/NO)? ***
SET SaveResultsInQVD=YES
Do you want to save the DA results in a QVD for later analysis by the DaCompareTool.qvw?  The default of “YES” is usually appropriate here.   QVD result files include a timestamp so you will always get new files for each run. Change to “NO” if you don’t want result QVDs.

 

REM *** Should the analyzer results be stored in a QVW (YES/NO)? ***

SET SaveResultsInQVW=YES
If “YES”, a DA QVW will be saved for each analysis and named “DocumentAnalyzer_your_qvwname.qvw”.  If a file exists with this name, it will be overwritten. If you don’t want individual DA QVWs, change this variable to “NO”.

 

After launching DABatch, you will receive one prompt:
Analysis Title? <ENTER> for 'Baseline'
The prompt is requesting a title to be assigned to the Result QVDs that will be consumed by DaCompareTool.  To accept the default of “Baseline”,  press <Enter>.  Otherwise type a new value and press <Enter>.


If you have set “SET SaveResultsInQVD=NO” as a configuration option, the title value is irrelevant.  (Perhaps I should not prompt in that case; next version?).


While the script is running Document Analyzer windows will be launched for each QVW and progress message displayed.  It’s best to keep your hands off the keyboard to get proper timings.  Good time to get that coffee.

When execution is complete you’ll see a summary message.
*****************************************************
Batch Analysis complete. 3 QVWs analyzed.
*****************************************************


You can now review each”DocumentAnalyzer_your_qvwname.qvw” file or load the result QVDs into DaCompareTool.qvw for comparative analysis.


Please let me know in the comments section if you can think of enhancements that support your use case for DA batch analysis.


-Rob
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QlikView to Qlik Sense Convertor

Are you migrating QlikView Apps to Qlik Sense?  Have you tried the new QlikView Convertor tool in QS 3.2? 

The QV Convertor tool is available from the Dev Hub in QS 3.2+.  It’s a pretty slick tool that converts QV Variables, Dimensions and Expressions to Master items and converts QV charts to Master QS Visualizations.  It does not attempt to replicate the sheets,  but expects you to place the visualizations on sheets yourself as required.

It’s a very useful tool with a good UI that allows for filtering and limiting what gets converted.

At the Atlanta Qlik Dev Group meeting on July 13 I’ll be demonstrating the tool and presenting some tips and considerations for doing conversions.   They’ve given me two hours (!) to speak so I’ll be covering several other topics as well.

-Rob

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Cookbook Tools Updates

Just a quick note about some recent updates to the Tools available on QlikViewCookbook.com

  • QV Document Analyzer V3.5 
    • Added new computed field, “Expression Table Count” that identifies how many tables are involved in a given expression.  Expressions that use data from more than one table typically run slower then those with all data in a single table.
    • Added “Like Objects Count” attribute for Objects, identifying candidates for linked objects.
    • Bug fixes.
  • Copy Groups Utility V2 allows for copying groups within the same QVW.
  • Script Log Analyzer V1.6 can analyze reload logs from both QlikView and Qlik Sense, Desktop and Server versions.  Interface is available in four languages.

-Rob

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Storing a Data Model in a Single QVD

Have you ever thought it might be interesting to store a  Qlik data model into a single QVD?  This can be useful in a number of cases such as:

  • Archiving (and retrieving) data models.
  • Overcoming the “single binary load” restriction.

QlikView Components (QVC) Version 11 introduced two new routines to do just that:

Qvc.ExportModel — Exports all tables of the current model into a single QVD.

Qvc.ImportModel — Import a data model created by Qvc.ExportModel.

Even if you don’t have QVC V11 installed, you can try Qvc.ExportModel right now using  http include.  Add these lines to any QlikView script (instructions for Qlik Sense further on down in this post).

$(Must_Include=https://github.com/RobWunderlich/Qlikview-Components/releases/download/v11.1/Qvc.qvs);
 CALL Qvc.ExportModel
 CALL Qvc.Cleanup

Mind the wrap. The Must_Include should be on one line. Using QVC requires the Qvc.qvs library be included (usually at the beginning of script), CALLing Qvc routines, and CALLing a Cleanup routine at the end of your script.

Assuming this script is included in “Sales Dash.qvw”,  the default exported model QVD will be named “Sales Dash.qvd” in the same directory.

 

Now, to import this QVD model into another qvw, replace the CALL to ExportModel in the above sample with:

CALL Qvc.ImportModel('Sales Dash.qvd')

The original model will be reconstructed as individual tables.

Qvc.ExportModel has three optional parameters:

CALL Qvc.ExportModel(['qvddir'],['qvdname'],['addTimestamp']);
Parameter Number Parameter Description
1 String. Optional. Relative or absolute directory where the model QVD will be stored. If relative, it follows the same rules as the STORE script statement for relative directory.
2 String, Optional. Name for the model QVD. If omitted, the name of the QVW will be used. For example, if QVW is “Sales.qvw”, then QVD will be “Sales.qvd”.
3 String, Optional. 1/0 True/False. If True, a timestamp of the form _YYYYMMDDhhmmss will be appended to the QVD name. Default if omitted is False.

 

Qlik Sense has no default path  so parameter #1, a lib:// for the QVD should be specified.  Alternatively, if a lib has been established with a DIRECTORY statement, parameter 1 can be omitted.

Qlik Sense will require a web file Connection for the http Must_Include.

webfile-connection

After defining the web connection and having an appropriate folder connection to store the QVD in,  Qlik Sense script would look like this:

$(Must_Include=lib://QvcWeb);
 Call Qvc.ExportModel('lib://QVData')
 CALL Qvc.Cleanup;

 

That’s all there is to it!  If you are already using QVC, I hope you’ll find these routines a welcome addition to the library.  If you are new to QC, explore more at QlikviewComponents.org.

-Rob

Thanks to Jörgen Peerik for raising the single-QVD export idea during a QVC class. 

 

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Preparing your script for QV12

Summary: I provide a tool to check your script for compatibility with QlikView version 12. 

I’ve blogged about a couple of script changes in QV12 here.  Since then I’ve also noticed that the $(include) statement is also affected by the Directory statement. That is, if the script below works in QV11, it will not work in QV12:

DIRECTORY Data;
 $(Must_Include=config.txt);

This is because QV11 looks for the file in the working directory where the QVW is, whereas QV12 will respect the DIRECTORY statement and look in the Data directory.

To summarize compatabilty considerations for QV12:

How will you know if you have existing  script that may be impacted by these changes in QV12?  In an earlier post, I introduced the Script Repository tool which can be used to search script across QVWs.

You can use the tool to  search for potential issues.  But I thought I would make it a bit easier by adding a dedicated “Version 12 Upgrade Check” sheet that does the searching and highlighting for you.

The chart at the top of the sheet will list any document that has script that should be examined further.  Select a document, press the highlight button and the script of interest will be outlined in yellow.

My guess is that most customers will not have any compatibility issues.  But why take chances?  Be a hero and scan your script before upgrading.

-Rob

Join me at an upcoming Masters Summit for Qlik event in Johannesburg (6-8 Sept) or Austin (10-12 Oct).  In my Advanced Scripting session, in addition to teaching important scripting techniques, we’ll look at methods and tools for managing your “script farm”. 

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Preparing for QlikView Version 12

There are a number of reasons you may want to upgrade to QV12, I’ll be posting about them in the next few weeks. Today’s post is specifically about what you must address to upgrade to QV12.

There are two items I’m aware of that you must be aware of and consider before upgrading.

  1. QlikView version 12 Server changes the default permission for the  EXECUTE script statement More details in this post.
  2. In QlikView 12, QVD functions now respect the DIRECTORY statement. This is a breaking change that may cause some of your QV11 script to return incorrect results or take incorrect conditional actions. More information in a post here.

So again, I’ll be blogging about new features you may want to take advantage of,  but above are the only two items I know of that you must consider before upgrading.

How do you know if you are using the impacted EXECUTE statement or QVD* functions? Perhaps you already have a tool in place to answer that question. But if you don’t, my colleagues at the Masters Summit for Qlik are making the Script Repository Tool (“ScriptRepo”) available for public download.

If you have attended a Masters Summit, then you already have a copy of ScriptRepo  in your takeaways.  if not, we would love to have you attend a Summit. But the Masters Summit Team understands the universal need for a tool like ScriptRepo whether you can attend the Summit or not.

The “ScriptRepo” tool extracts script from a directory of QVWs and then allows you to do a global search for script of interest such as “Execute”. Plug in the directory path that contains qvw files,  and a temporary work directory to extract the script into:

384

Press the “Extract & Reload” button and each QVW file in the input directory will be opened and the script extracted. The open is done with “nodata”, so the extraction runs relatively fast — about one qvw per second.

After extraction, you can use your favorite search tool to scan the output directory, or use the builtin QlikView search & display from the “Script Search” sheet.

After searching for “customer” and selecting a candidate qvw:

276

 

I hope to see you at the Milan Summit in April 2016 or a USA location in Fall 2016.  If you have questions about the Summit or using the ScriptRepo tool, let us know through the QlikView Cookbook Contact form or the Masters Summit Contact page.

-Rob

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